RESEARCH WITH A SOCIAL JUSTICE IMPACT

UTS Law Research draws on law’s ability to enforce social change. Our accomplished researchers, working in many different areas of law, are committed to shaping the society we live in – whether by advocating for legislative and policy change, or responsibly informing public debate.

 

We’ve powered ahead in the research arena and are acknowledged as having a research performance ‘above world standard’ by the Australian Government’s Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) initiative.

Our research culture is a vibrant and inclusive one. It is cross-disciplinary, collaborative and rigorous, with developing areas of excellence in ‘Health Justice’ and ‘Law and History’.

Professor Jennifer Burn, director of UTS Law’s Anti-Slavery Australia (ASA), received the 2016 Deputy Vice Chancellor’s (Research) Medal for Research Impact. Since 2008, Jennifer has been a member of the Commonwealth’s National Roundtable on Human Trafficking, and her work at ASA has a made a lasting impact on the effort to abolish slavery-like practices in Australia.

Senior lecturer Dr Laurie Berg received the Early Career Research Excellence Award. The award, which celebrates original, innovative and impactful research, is awarded to a researcher who has completed their PhD within the last five years. Laurie, who researches in the area of migrant and refugee rights, is currently creating a best practice model to address the workplace protection of the estimated 10,000 au pairs working in Australia.

Two of our academics were awarded the prestigious UTS Vice Chancellor’s Awards for Research Excellence in 2016. The Awards recognise the wide-reaching contribution made by UTS academics to research.

Professor Jennifer Burn, director of UTS Law’s Anti-Slavery Australia (ASA), received the 2016 Deputy Vice Chancellor’s (Research) Medal for Research Impact. Since 2008, Jennifer has been a member of the Commonwealth’s National Roundtable on Human Trafficking, and her work at ASA has a made a lasting impact on the effort to abolish slavery-like practices in Australia.

Senior lecturer Dr Laurie Berg received the Early Career Research Excellence Award. The award, which celebrates original, innovative and impactful research, is awarded to a researcher who has completed their PhD within the last five years. Laurie, who researches in the area of migrant and refugee rights, is currently creating a best practice model to address the workplace protection of the estimated 10,000 au pairs working in Australia.

“This broader recognition of the impact and excellence of our legal research is a notable achievement for a young Faculty, and the ERA ranking places our legal research at ‘above world standard,” says Professor Brian Opeskin, Associate Dean (Research)

Australian Research Council Grants

UTS Law has had several years of success in the annual Australian Research Council (ARC) grant rounds. Last year, we were awarded three ARC grants; including a Discovery and two LIEF (Linkage Information Equipment and Facilities) grants.

Professor Natalie Stoianoff was awarded an ARC Linkage grant to protect indigenous traditional knowledge. Her research will lay the foundations for a body to administer a legal framework to ensure indigenous communities are consulted and receive benefit when their knowledge is shared.  

Professor Andrew Mowbray and Dr Michael Rawling also won ARC LIEF grants, while Professor Katherine Biber won a Discovery grant.

Areas of Research Excellence

Our legal scholars are experienced and well established experts, researching in diverse areas of legal scholarship. As we’ve grown, two dynamic areas of research excellence – ‘Health Justice’ and ‘Law and History’ – have emerged.

The ‘Health Justice’ group, under the directorship of Professor Jenni Millbank, is exploring the legal complexities of health regulation. Researchers include Professor Isabel Karpin and Dr Karen O’Connell, who are currently working on an ARC Discovery Project that seeks to assess whether current laws are adequate to protect people with a disability.

The ‘Law and History’ group, under the directorship of Professor Shaunnagh Dorsett, brings to the study of law specialised interdisciplinary research methodologies in order to examine and better understand legal institutions, doctrines and processes and the ways in which they might develop in the future. Projects include that of Associate Professor Isabella Alexander, who brings her specialisations in history and intellectual property to bear on an consideration of the ways in which the modern copyright regime has developed.

 

Australian Research Council Grants

UTS Law has had several years of success in the annual Australian Research Council (ARC) grant rounds. Last year, we were awarded three ARC grants; including a Discovery and two LIEF (Linkage Information Equipment and Facilities) grants.

Professor Natalie Stoianoff was awarded an ARC Linkage grant to protect indigenous traditional knowledge. Her research will lay the foundations for a body to administer a legal framework to ensure indigenous communities are consulted and receive benefit when their knowledge is shared.  

Professor Andrew Mowbray and Dr Michael Rawling also won ARC LIEF grants, while Professor Katherine Biber won a Discovery grant.

 

Areas of Research Excellence

Our legal scholars are experienced and well-established experts, researching in diverse areas of legal scholarship. As we’ve grown, two dynamic areas of research excellence– ‘Health Justice’ and ‘Law and History’ – have emerged.

The ‘Health Justice’ group, under the directorship of Professor Jenny Millbank, is exploring the legal complexities of health regulation. Researchers include Professor Isabel Karpin and Dr Karen O’Connell, who are currently working on an ARC Discovery Project that seeks to assess whether current laws are adequate to protect people with a disability.

The ‘Law and History’ group, under the directorship of Professor Shaunnagh Dorsett, brings to the study of law specialised interdisciplinary research methodologies in order to examine and better understand legal institutions, doctrines and processes and the ways in which they might develop in the future. Projects include that of Associate Professor Isabella Alexander, who brings her specialisations in history and intellectual property to bear on an consideration of the ways in which the modern copyright regime has developed.