LOOKING FORWARD

UTS Law and the Future of the Legal Profession

UTS Law has adopted initiatives to place the Law School at the forefront of practice-based education and research. “We are not relying on our past successes but committing ourselves to a strong performance in the future,” says Professor Lesley Hitchens, Dean.

UTS Law is significantly growing its international and local internships to offer more global experiences, such as BUiLD (Beyond UTS International Leadership Development), overseas exchanges and summer schools.

UTS Law has adopted initiatives to place the Law School at the forefront of practice-based education and research. “We are not relying on our past successes but committing ourselves to a strong performance in the future,” says Professor Lesley Hitchens, Dean.

UTS Law is significantly growing its international and local internships to offer more global experiences, such as BUiLD (Beyond UTS International Leadership Development), overseas exchanges and summer schools.

“Today, a legal education is not just about training students to be legal practitioners but also professionals within the discipline of law to equip them to function in a dynamic environment”, says Professor Lesley Hitchens, Dean

There’s no doubt that technology is transforming the work of lawyers and the delivery of legal services. In 2015, we launched the Future of the Legal Profession series – a set of talks designed to address the various implications of technology’s global impact on the industry. “Technology is deeply affecting the way lawyers engage with their clients and approach the law,” says Hitchens.

We’re looking to the future, and considering how the industry has and will continue to change. It’s more important now than ever to imbue students with innovative tech skills; that’s why we’ve collaborated with a number of leading legal-tech companies to deliver new opportunities to students. Last year, we kicked off the Allens Neota UTS Law Tech Challenge for Social Justice, a partnership with international commercial law firm Allens and AI software producer Neota Logic.

Through the program, 20 law students from the Brennan Justice and Leadership initiative will work with Allens’ staff to use Neota Logic software to develop law apps. These apps will employ artificial intelligence technology to identify legal issues facing a number of NGOs, so they can be addressed online.

Our curriculum is also going undergoing a redesign, because we want to be equipped to address students’ changing career needs. “Today, a legal education is not just about training students to be legal practitioners but also professionals within the discipline of law to equip them to function in a dynamic environment,” says Hitchens.

There’s no doubt that technology is transforming the work of lawyers and the delivery of legal services. In 2015, we launched the Future of the Legal Profession series – a set of talks designed to address the various implications of technology’s global impact on the industry. “Technology is deeply affecting the way lawyers engage with their clients and approach the law,” says Hitchens.

We’re looking to the future, and considering how the industry has and will continue to change. It’s more important now than ever to imbue students with innovative tech skills; that’s why we’ve collaborated with a number of leading legal-tech companies to deliver new opportunities to students. Last year, we kicked off the Allens Neota UTS Law Tech Challenge for Social Justice, a partnership with international commercial law firm Allens and AI software producer Neota Logic.

Through the program, 20 law students from the Brennan Justice and Leadership initiative will work with Allens’ staff to use Neota Logic software to develop law apps. These apps will employ artificial intelligence technology to identify legal issues facing a number of NGOs, so they can be addressed online.

Our curriculum is also going undergoing a redesign, because we want to be equipped to address students’ changing career needs. “Today, a legal education is not just about training students to be legal practitioners but also professionals within the discipline of law to equip them to function in a dynamic environment,” says Hitchens.